Back to China!

 

As always, a month in the States flew by.
I received my student visa by mail 5 days ago so I’m all legal for a re-entry into China. My most recent newsletter was sent 2 days ago so those who receive that, be looking for it in the mail soon.
I’ve had a lot of highlights, including a cook-out at my aunt and uncle’s house to a few days ago.

Charles (Chuck) Wieck, my dad's younger brother, at the grill.

Charles (Chuck) Wieck, my dad’s younger brother, at the grill.

The men of the family, enjoying bonding time.  My brother, Paul, to the right, Chuck (center) and my dad (right)

The men of the family, enjoying bonding time. My brother, Paul, to the right, Chuck (center) and my dad (right)

The Wiecks, minus my aunt.  Left to right:  Chuck, me, Donna (my sister-in-law), Paul (brother, behind her), my mother (in green) and my dad.

The Wiecks, minus my aunt. Left to right: Chuck, me, Donna (my sister-in-law), Paul (brother, behind her), my mother (in green) and my dad.

Attending Prayer in the Spirit of Taize      

Another highlight of my stay was when my mother and I attended a monthly prayer service in the spirit of Taize.  The prayer program explained all of this, which was new for me and my mom. The following are excerpts:

What is the Taize Community?

Taize (pronounced tei-zay) was a village in France, the home of an international, ecumenical community founded by Brother Roger. He was the son of a Lutheran pastor who acquired a small farm in the village in 1940. He welcomed those in need to his home, working out a call to follow Christ in community that would attempt to live out the Gospel day by day. In 1949, he was joined by his first brothers.
Today, the Taize Community is composed of over a hundred brothers, both Catholic and Protestant, from more than 25 nations. They make a life commitment to live togetgher in joy, simplicity and mercy as a “parable of community,” a sign of reconciliation at the heart of the world. 

As for the service, there are no rules but the 1-hour prayer time is composed of readings, repetitive singing, prayer and lighting of candles to remind us that even when the night is dark, Christ’s love is a fire tha never goes out.

Our Taize prayer vigil was at St. Mary-of-the-Woods College in their 1876 church.  The theme was “Drought,” with the evening’s donations given to Living Water International (www.water.cc).  All services were focusing on the Year of the River, which is Terre Haute, Indiana’s celebration of the Wabash River. (St. Mary’s is located near Terre Haute.)

Here are a few pictures for you to enjoy of the evening, before and after, as a closing of this entry.  Next reports will be from China, where I’m sure I’ll have lots of travel news to report.

From Illinois, here’s sending you Ping An (Peace) for your day.

My mother on the campus, in front of St. Mary's 1876 church.

My mother on the campus, in front of St. Mary’s 1876 church.

We enter the church in silence before the  service begins.

Church of the Immaculate Conception, St. Mary-of-the-Woods

We enter in silence before the service begins.

We enter in silence before the service begins.

After the service, it's my turn for a photo.

After the service, it’s my turn for a photo.

Mother Theodore Guerin, sainted a few years ago, is the founder of the college (1841).

Mother Theodore Guerin, sainted a few years ago, is the founder of the college (1841).

About connieinchina

I have been in the Asia region for 18 years as an English language teacher. 13 of those have been spent with the Amity Foundation, a Chinese NGO that works in all areas of development for the Chinese people. Amity teachers are placed at small colleges throughout China as instructors of English language majors in the education field. In other words, my students will one day be English teachers themselves in their small villages or towns once they graduate. Currently, this is my second year in Guangxi Province at the 3-year college, Guangxi Normal University for Nationalities. The college is located in smalltown longzhou, 1 hour from the Vietnam border.
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One Response to Back to China!

  1. Sharon White says:

    What an interesting prayer service!

    Sent from my iPad

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