Wonderful News from Luzhou: Canine Rescue Has a Home!

After that last entry,  it’s time to report some good news, sent in an email this morning: DP has a home!

A playful DP, ready for adoption.

A playful DP, ready for adoption.

A Re-cap of DP

I wrote in a previous post that, before leaving for the States, I had taken into my care a 3-month-old puppy dumped on the campus by one of our students.  I named him DP (Dormitory Puppy) because the girls’ dormitory was his hang-out while anxiously awaiting the return of his owner, who had abandoned him to go home for the summer.

Healthy at first, he soon became sick.  Rather than watch the poor thing die a sad, lingering death, I hustled him off to our local vet. He was diagnosed with a common canine killer, the parvo virus.

A very, very sick dog.  Here Dr. Mao  examines DP on his arrival to the clinic.

A very, very sick dog. Here Dr. Mao examines DP on his arrival to the clinic.

Since his illness was so progressed, no one was sure he’d live long enough for the full treatments necessary but, amazingly enough, he did . I visited him every day at the clinic, taking him for walks and giving a little people pampering, up to the day before I left for America.

The vets and I had already reached a monetary agreement of how much I’d pay for them to house him, care for him and eventually find him a home while I was gone.

DP's home in the clinic until someone adopts him.  My last photo on him before leaving for America.

DP’s home in the clinic until someone adopts him. My last photo of him before I left for America.

Although a sweet, gentle puppy, my biggest concern was his size.  This was going to be a BIG dog.  So few in China want a big dog.  Would our 3 vets (Dr. Huang, Dr. Mao and Dr. Li) be able to find a Chinese animal lover willing to raise what would potentially be a huge animal?

I really had my doubts.

The Exciting Email

         But this morning, an uplifting message about our deserted doggy was waiting for me in my inbox, sent from my Chinese sister, Cathy (Li Xiaolian).

Since I would be in the States for a month, I’d given Cathy’s telephone number to Dr. Huang for him to call if someone wanted to adopt DP.  That way, Cathy could relay the news to me while I was away.

Sure enough, there it was this morning.

Cathy wrote:  “I received a phone from dog hospital, there a good lady take your dog, they gave me the phone number of that lady, and said if you want to know about detail, you can phone to them.”

Oh, Happy Day!

      When I read that note, I could hardly contain my excitement.  Not only does DP have a home, he seems to have a truly great home!

I think you can all guess the first thing I’ll be doing once I land back in Luzhou:   Call DP’s new owner and hopefully set up a time when I can visit this “good lady” who has so kindly adopted my big-pawed stray.

Now that certainly will be a great beginning to the school year.

From Illinois, here’s wishing you Ping An (Peace) for your weekend.

About connieinchina

I have been in the Asia region for 18 years as an English language teacher. 13 of those have been spent with the Amity Foundation, a Chinese NGO that works in all areas of development for the Chinese people. Amity teachers are placed at small colleges throughout China as instructors of English language majors in the education field. In other words, my students will one day be English teachers themselves in their small villages or towns once they graduate. Currently, this is my second year in Guangxi Province at the 3-year college, Guangxi Normal University for Nationalities. The college is located in smalltown longzhou, 1 hour from the Vietnam border.
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